Computing Canada

May 2015

Computing Canada is the crossroads of business and technology. Delivering enterprise technology, networking, telecom, career, managed services, cloud computing, and other technologies and services that enable business.

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32 I MAY 2015 I ITWorldCanada.com SH A RK TA LE S I f there's something you really hate, like having to wake up early on weekends or people who cut the line at the grocery or going to the beach and getting sand in your bag of chips, there are a number of ways to express your feelings on the Internet. However, come June this year, you can now also snap up a domain name like sandinmy- bagofchips.sucks from Canadian Internet reg- istry company Vox Populi. Vox Populi recently gained control of the paid domain name ge- neric top level domain (gTLD) .sucks. Domain name regulator Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), however, is worried that the .sucks domain name would be used to "shake down" large companies and famous individuals. ICANN has even gone as far as to ask the Canadian Of- fice of Consumer Affairs (OCA) and the United States Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to de- termine if the Canadian Internet registry firm Vox Populi is doing anything illegal. It's not hard to imagine how a .sucks Web site could be a major headache for ICANN down the road. Vox Populi is reportedly charging $3,146 for a .sucks Web site name before it goes public in June. Typical Web site registration only costs about $12 to $31. So far, bing.sucks, youtube.suck, visa.sucks and a host of other dotsucks have reportedly been bought. It's called "defensive registering," an attempt to protect a brand by preventing oth- er parties from creating an online presence that would attack that brand. Some media reports indicated that Facebook, Google, and Microsoft are among the large companies as well as singer Taylor Swift, have bought up the domains to exercise their trademark priority rights. Of course ICANN has itself partly to blame for its troubles. After all, the regulator fueled the digital vanity plate craze and Vox Populi paid ICANN some $232,000 to apply for.sucks and won the domain name in a private auction against bidders. And that sucks. .sucks really bad

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